Flood Insurance

Flooding is something that none of us want to think about, but that we all need to be prepared for! We’ve all seen the images on television and in the newspaper — people’s homes damaged or destroyed by flash floods, swollen creeks, rivers, or bayous, or as a result of a tropical storm or hurricane. Some of us have even had our own property damaged as a result of rising water.

Homeowners Insurance does not cover flood damage. Renters Insurance does not cover flood damage. Flood insurance is the ONLY way to protect your property in the event of damage caused by a flood. And to be effective, it must be purchased in advance of any expected storm. Many people scurry to purchase flood insurance when a hurricane begins to threaten their area. By then it is too late.

Do I need flood insurance?
If you live in an area that is recognized as being located in a “floodplain”, your mortgage lender will require you to carry flood insurance. If you live outside of a known floodplain, you should do some research to determine if flood insurance is right for you.

According to FEMA, flooding is the #1 natural disaster, and approximately 30% of flood insurance claims are filed by people who reside in areas that are considered to be low or moderate-risk flood zones.

As always, we will be happy to sit down with you, study your home’s location, and help you decide if flood insurance is right for you. The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is managed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Click Here for a brochure regarding this program.

Flood Map
The risks of flooding are not completely reliant on whether or not you live in a floodplain. Everyone is at some risk of flood damage due to severe storms, heavy rain, or even blocked drains. If you would like to know more about the flooding expectations around your home, Click Here to find a flood map for your area. Please note that these maps are updated occasionally, and flood expectations can change with alterations to the surrounding landscape including changes that occur miles away upstream along rivers, creeks and bayous.